Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
AMT cover
Executive editors:
Thomas
 
Wagner
,
Hartwig
 
Harder
Joanna
 
Joiner
Paolo
 
Laj
 &
Andreas
 
Richter

Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of advances in remote sensing, as well as in situ and laboratory measurement techniques for the constituents and properties of the Earth's atmosphere.

The main subject areas comprise the development, intercomparison, and validation of measurement instruments and techniques of data processing and information retrieval for gases, aerosols, and clouds. The manuscript types considered for peer-reviewed publication are research articles, review articles, and commentaries.

News

Geographical distribution of views now available in journal ALMs

08 Sep 2016

Copernicus Publications has extended the article level metrics (ALMs) by showing the geographical distribution of views. This information is available for articles published after 3 August 2016.

Institutional agreement for AMT authors affiliated with the Leibniz Association

01 Sep 2016

Copernicus Publications and the Leibniz Association have agreed on a central billing of article processing charges (APCs) to facilitate the publication procedure for authors. So far three Leibniz institutes are participating in this agreement.

Institutional agreement for AMT authors affiliated with the Leibniz Universität Hannover

11 Jan 2016

Copernicus Publications and the Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) in Hanover, Germany have signed an agreement on central billing of article processing charges.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

Surface-based two-filter radon detectors monitor the ambient concentration of atmospheric radon-222, a natural tracer of mixing and transport. They are sensitive, but respond slowly to ambient changes in radon concentration. In this paper, a deconvolution method is used to successfully correct observations for the instrument response. Case studies demonstrate that it is beneficial, sometimes necessary, to account for the detector response, especially when studying near-surface mixing.

A. D. Griffiths, S. D. Chambers, A. G. Williams, and S. Werczynski

New radiosonde instruments for humidity-, radiation- and gas profile measurements were introduced in recent years, for atmospheric research and climate monitoring. Such instruments are intended to be reused on multiple flights. Here we introduce the return glider radiosonde (RGR), which enables flying and retrieving valuable in situ upper-air instruments. The RGR is lifted with weather balloons to a preset altitude, and a built-in autopilot flies the glider autonomously back to the launch site.

A. Kräuchi and R. Philipona

Using data from a new airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) instrument, we present a technique for the detection and wide-area mapping of emission plumes of methane and other atmospheric trace gas species over challenging and diverse environmental conditions with high spatial resolution, that permits direct attribution to sources in complex environments.

G. C. Hulley, R. M. Duren, F. M. Hopkins, S. J. Hook, N. Vance, P. Guillevic, W. R. Johnson, B. T. Eng, J. M. Mihaly, V. M. Jovanovic, S. L. Chazanoff, Z. K. Staniszewski, L. Kuai, J. Worden, C. Frankenberg, G. Rivera, A. D. Aubrey, C. E. Miller, N. K. Malakar, J. M. Sánchez Tomás, and K. T. Holmes

This paper is presenting a feasibility study focused on methods of estimating the turbulence intensity based on a class of navigational messages routinely broadcast by the commercial aircraft (known as ADS-B and Mode-S). Using this kind of information could have potentially significant impact on aviation safety. Three methods have been investigated.

J. M. Kopeć, K. Kwiatkowski, S. de Haan, and S. P. Malinowski

We validate 2-D ionospheric tomography reconstructions against EISCAT incoherent scatter radar measurements. The method is based on Bayesian statistical inversion. We employ ionosonde measurements for the choice of the prior distribution parameters and use a sparse matrix approximation for the computations. This results in a computationally efficient tomography algorithm with clear probabilistic interpretation. We find that ionosonde measurements improve the reconstruction significantly.

J. Norberg, I. I. Virtanen, L. Roininen, J. Vierinen, M. Orispää, K. Kauristie, and M. S. Lehtinen

Publications Copernicus